Tips for Teen Sellers from eBay Sensation Nandry Guffey

 

By Shana Champion at eBay Business Blog | June 6, 2016

Never mind babysitting. At twelve, Nandry Guffey of rural Kentucky opted for a job selling second-hand treasures on eBay.* And I thought Kelly L. of TVChopShop started young.

Nandry’s venture began innocently enough. She listed an old Nintendo Game Station that she got at a yard sale for $10. After a heated eBay auction, she grossed over $100—which is a lot for a kid. That’s all it took. Nandry was struck with a severe case of eBay fever and things have never been the same. Fast forward six years and she’s a Top Rated Seller (with her own account), who regularly buys hundreds of pounds of merchandise to re-sell on eBay. Yes, hundreds.

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And—in her spare time—Nandry runs The Teen Thrifter blog, which is all about her life as a young eBay seller. So, yeah, she’s an inspiration too.

Nandry. You are quite the young businessperson. How do you have time to sell on eBay, go to school, and blog so prolifically?

My secret is that I was home-schooled. Basically as long as I got my schoolwork done, I had time to do what I call “fun stuff.” And most of the time, that was selling on eBay. I love making money—always have. And I never felt right about asking my parents for an allowance.

Very commendable. I was babysitting at twelve. And let me tell you, I wish I’d have had the eBay option. I bet you’ve learned so much about business.

Definitely. eBay’s been my life for the last four years. It’s been like a crash course in how to run a small business. It’s also enabled me to finance a car and pay it off in two years, take fun trips, and have financial independence that doesn’t require clocking in at a fast food restaurant, or working regular hours. That’s what I love most. This job is on my terms. Plus, it’s opened so many doors. I’ve been able to include the experience on my college applications, and even get scholarships. I’ll be going to college in the fall for Physical Therapy—and everything is paid for.

[You can finish reading the rest of this article at Terapeak. Click here.]

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